Trust a biochemist

At the molecular level of life matters may be small and energy gains and losses seemingly insignificant, but a broad understanding of biochemistry leads to profound, larger conclusions of cell biology and the energy of which is ultimately the existence of life. Just as the smallest ingredient such as a dash of salt can change the flavor of a recipe, the cell can be affected by the slightest difference that ultimately means life or death.

Biochemical knowledge, in short, is fundamental for comprehending cells. And because cell biology is fundamental to all biological sciences, lack of biochemistry training severely limits the would-be biologist, medical practitioner, and health practitioner. 

So be sure to ask your doctor, nutritionist and nutrition science writer, “How’s your biochemistry?” If they can adequately explain the difference between activation energy and change in free energy (see last post), then they pass the test. If they roll their eyes at you, be cautious.

Published by David Despain, MS, CFS

David is a science and health writer living on Long Island, New York. He's written for a variety of publications including Scientific American, Outside Online, the American Society for Nutrition's (ASN) Nutrition Notes Daily, and Institute of Food Technologists' (IFT) Food Technology magazine and Live! blog. He's also covered new findings reported at scientific meetings including Experimental Biology, AAAS, AOCS, CASW, Sigma Xi, IFT, and others on his personal blog "Evolving Health." David is also an active member of organizations including the National Association of Science Writers (NASW), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Society for Nutrition, the Institute of Food Technologists, and the National Audubon Society. David has a master's degree in human nutrition from the University of Bridgeport, and a bachelor's degree in English from University of Illinois at Springfield. He also earned his Certified Food Scientist credential from the Institute of Food Technologists.

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