Exercise lowers inflammation associated with heart disease

A study published in 2005 evaluated levels of C-reactive protein in sedentary men and women when placed on an exercise training program for five months. The patients significantly reduced the C-reactive proteins in the blood. 
High levels of C-reactive protein in the blood indicates inflammation associated with heart disease, stroke and hypertension. 
The patients who exercised also produced marked changes in body weight, glucose, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure. 
What does this mean? That despite all my efforts to avoid exercise by living an otherwise healthy lifestyle, I gotta head to the gym. Or else.  
Reference
Lakka TA, Lakka HM, Rankinen T, Leon AS, Rao DC, Skinner JS, Wilmore JH, Bouchard C. Effect of exercise training on plasma levels of C-reactive protein healthy adults: the HERITAGE Family Study. European Heart Journal, 26, 2018–2025, 2005 doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehi394

Published by David Despain, MS, CFS

David is a science and health writer living on Long Island, New York. He's written for a variety of publications including Scientific American, Outside Online, the American Society for Nutrition's (ASN) Nutrition Notes Daily, and Institute of Food Technologists' (IFT) Food Technology magazine and Live! blog. He's also covered new findings reported at scientific meetings including Experimental Biology, AAAS, AOCS, CASW, Sigma Xi, IFT, and others on his personal blog "Evolving Health." David is also an active member of organizations including the National Association of Science Writers (NASW), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Society for Nutrition, the Institute of Food Technologists, and the National Audubon Society. David has a master's degree in human nutrition from the University of Bridgeport, and a bachelor's degree in English from University of Illinois at Springfield. He also earned his Certified Food Scientist credential from the Institute of Food Technologists.

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