Anticoagulants a factor for thrombosis?

Next time you’re on a long car trip, check your legs to see if one is redder or warmer than the other. Or if your calf or thigh begins to ache. These could be symptoms of deep vein thrombosis, especially if you’re genetically predisposed. Inactivity can cause the condition and blood thinners like heparin or warfarin are generally used as treatment (1).

But while we understand that hypercoagulation can be a factor for thrombosis, it’s important to note that anticoagulants can also potentially cause thrombosis. Oral anticoagulants can increase severity of bleeding, which can exacerbate intracerebral hemorrhage leading to significantly higher risk of a thromboembolic events (2).

Exercise and take your fish oil softgels!

References

1. WebMD. Deep vein thrombosis: Topic overview. Available at: http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/tc/deep-vein-thrombosis-topic-overview.

2. Goldstein JN, Fazen LE, Wendell L et al. Risk of thromboembolism following acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Neurocrit Care 2009;10:28-34.

Published by David Despain, MS, CFS

David is a science and health writer living on Long Island, New York. He's written for a variety of publications including Scientific American, Outside Online, the American Society for Nutrition's (ASN) Nutrition Notes Daily, and Institute of Food Technologists' (IFT) Food Technology magazine and Live! blog. He's also covered new findings reported at scientific meetings including Experimental Biology, AAAS, AOCS, CASW, Sigma Xi, IFT, and others on his personal blog "Evolving Health." David is also an active member of organizations including the National Association of Science Writers (NASW), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Society for Nutrition, the Institute of Food Technologists, and the National Audubon Society. David has a master's degree in human nutrition from the University of Bridgeport, and a bachelor's degree in English from University of Illinois at Springfield. He also earned his Certified Food Scientist credential from the Institute of Food Technologists.

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