Molybdenum and Gout

A young electrician with a painful gouty arthritis in 2005 became the first case observed of occupational exposure of toxic amounts of molybdenum (1). Molybdenum is an activator of xanthine oxidase, which oxidizes xanthine producing uric acid (2). Too much produced hyperuricemia (1). The electrician can be thankful that his doctors found the cause of the gout because of previous men afflicted with gout by having consumed 10 to 15 mg of molybdenum daily (3;4). Tolerable uptake limits are set at 2 mg (2).

Reference List
1. Selden AI, Berg NP, Soderbergh A, Bergstrom BE. Occupational molybdenum exposure and a gouty electrician. Occup Med (Lond) 2005;55:145-8.2. Gropper SS, Smith JL, Groff JL. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth, 2009.3. http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/minerals/molybdenum/4. http://www.crnusa.org/safetypdfs/027CRNSafetyMolybdenum.pdf

Published by David Despain, MS, CFS

David is a science and health writer living on Long Island, New York. He's written for a variety of publications including Scientific American, Outside Online, the American Society for Nutrition's (ASN) Nutrition Notes Daily, and Institute of Food Technologists' (IFT) Food Technology magazine and Live! blog. He's also covered new findings reported at scientific meetings including Experimental Biology, AAAS, AOCS, CASW, Sigma Xi, IFT, and others on his personal blog "Evolving Health." David is also an active member of organizations including the National Association of Science Writers (NASW), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Society for Nutrition, the Institute of Food Technologists, and the National Audubon Society. David has a master's degree in human nutrition from the University of Bridgeport, and a bachelor's degree in English from University of Illinois at Springfield. He also earned his Certified Food Scientist credential from the Institute of Food Technologists.

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