Evolving Health

Monthly Archives: December 2009

When I was in high school, one of my best friends was a long-distance runner and a dancer. After only a few months of training, I knew something was wrong. She changed her diet to one of protein and almost no other calories. She was obsessed with exercise leading to a loss of many of her friends. Later on she lost a lot of weight and, to me, instead of becoming healthier… Read More

My thoughts after reading “A Review of Family Meal Influence on Adolescents’ Dietary Intake” by Sarah Woodruff and Rhona Hanning: It’s pretty easy to imagine why having dinner with one’s family would instill positive nutritional habits. Even the word family exudes in its meaning what goes further to credit an environment of caring and, above all, nurturing. When mother and father are at the table, they are naturally given to see to… Read More

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is an enzyme that is concentrated in the hepatocytes. When the liver is injured or affected by disease, the enzyme is released into the bloodstream. When jaundice occurs, for example, elevated ALT levels can distinguish a liver injury or disease instead of red blood cell hemolysis. The test is performed on a patient by collecting 7-10 mL of blood in a red-top tube, then sending it to a lab… Read More

An abnormal lipid profile is a consistent indicator of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CHD). Blood lipids include total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C and triglycerides. Because each of these factors are ultimately affected by diet, it serves to reason to recommend dietary strategies to help lower total cholesterol and LDL-C, increase HDL-C and reduce triglyceride levels. ATP III uses the term therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLC) for recommendations that can help to improve abnormal lipid… Read More

I have three children, one boy, 13 and two girls, 10 and 11. As far as I’m concerned prevention of atherosclerosis should begin as early as possible. That means yesterday. However, I understand that there exists some uncertainty of exactly what age to begin prevention. It has to do partly with juvenile fatty streaks. What may appear unimaginable is that the occurrence of juvenile fatty streaks somehow may have an importance in… Read More

Normally, measuring insulin directly is more accurate with diabetics. But C-peptide levels more accurately reflect islet cell function in situations of insulinomas as well as cases of diabetics taking exogenous insulin (for treatment or secretly). C-peptide, short for “connecting peptide” is the protein connecting beta/alpha chains of proinsulin. The chains are separated when proinsulin becomes insulin and C-peptide. C-peptide ends up in equal amounts to insulin in the portal vein, lasts longer… Read More

Measuring blood glucose periodically is critical for staying off the blood sugar rollercoaster. But how can a clinician be sure a patient hasn’t gotten on board the rollercoaster? This is when glyosylated hemoglobin comes into the picture. What happens is that when a person is diabetic and doesn’t adequately control blood glucose, her or his blood glucose becomes elevated. The hyperglycemia that results begins to affect certain proteins in the blood as… Read More

John and Susan are both prone to being overweight. They are concerned that their infant son, Steven will also have weight problems. They are referred to you when Steven is 5 months old. Steven’s growth data are as follows Age Weight Length Birth 8lb 20inches 1 week 8lb 1oz 20 inches 1 month ll lb. 21.5 inches 2 month 12lb 8oz 23 inches 3 month 14lb 8oz 23.5 inches4 month 16lb 25.5… Read More